Impakt | X-ing Designs: Incorporating modern design and Indigenous symbols | Impakt
When Impakt began working on Creating a New Narrative research report, jointly funded by Indian Business Corporation (IBC) and Business Development Bank of Canada (BDC), they knew involving an Indigenous woman in the design process of the report and logo was imperative. Impakt wanted a final product that truly represented Indigenous Canadian women in a contemporary and relevant way. After a vetting process, we selected X-ing Design and are excited to share more about Megan Currie’s work.
social responsibility, corporate, graphic design, Impakt, Creating a New Narrative, Nicole Bryck, Indian Business Corporation, Business Development Bank of Canada, Indigenous women, X-ing Designs, Megan Currie, Paul Klein, dreamcatchers and feathers, symbols that represent Indigenous cultures in Canada, Indigenous Women's Loan Fund, syllabics, sage plant, women's medicine
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X-ing Design, a Regina graphic design company that incorporates modern design and Indigenous symbols

X-ingDesigns Feature

X-ing Design, a Regina graphic design company that incorporates modern design and Indigenous symbols

 

By Nicole Bryck | August 30, 2017

 

When Impakt began working on Creating a New Narrative research report, jointly funded by Indian Business Corporation (IBC) and Business Development Bank of Canada (BDC), they knew involving an Indigenous woman in the design process of the report and logo was imperative. Impakt wanted a final product that truly represented Indigenous Canadian women in a contemporary and relevant way. After a vetting process, we selected X-ing Design and are excited to share more about Megan Currie’s work.

 

With origins from the English River First Nation (Dene) and currently based out of Regina, Saskatchewan on Treaty 4 land, Megan Currie is the creative director and owner of X-ing Design. Currie’s educational pursuits have taken her through; Northlands Design College in Melbourne, Australia, Nova Scotia College of Art and Design in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Las Universidad de Las Americas in Cholula, Mexico and finally The First Nations University of Canada in Regina. This global education, combined with her First Nation’s background, provides her with a unique perspective on design that is evident in her techniques, styles and design process.

 

 

megan

 

 

When embarking on her education, Currie began to notice trends in the current Indigenous Canadian design landscape, “the designs seemed to incorporate a lot of dreamcatchers and feathers and were drawing on a lot of overused symbols. A large majority of existing designers seemed to think that those symbols represented Indigenous cultures in Canada. The design landscape was stagnant, repetitive and was not evolving at the same pace as actual communities and cultures.” It was Currie’s mission to progress that landscape in her own design practice.

 

 

x-ing_logo_final

 

 

At X-ing Design, Currie strives to represent modern day Indigenous people and cultures by incorporating modern design techniques and drawing from a hybrid of Indigenous symbols and artistic styles. This drive for cross-cultural design is exactly why her business is called X-ing Design. For an interesting insight into her design process and own logo development take a peek at X-ing the Gap in Cross-Cultural Design.

 

 

Indigenous Women's Loan Fund

 

 

When designing the beautiful logo for the Indigenous women’s loan fund, Currie started by custom designing a typeface that was inspired by the Canadian Aboriginal syllabic writing. This is an important feature of the logo as many Indigenous communities are strongly attached to syllabics and consider syllabics a writing system that belongs to them. She then incorporated her rendition of the Sage plant, as sage is commonly referred to as women’s medicine in many Indigenous Canadian cultures. The combination of the typeface and the sage symbol strives to represent Indigenous Canadian women in a honourable and respectful way.

 

Impakt is thrilled with the outcome of both the design of the final report and the logo and very grateful for the time spent on it. Currie was a pleasure to work with and we would highly recommend her to anyone. Visit the site at this links to see more of Currie’s work, check out X-ing Designs and to read more about her! Or you can contact Megan directly at mdcurrie@x-ingdesign.ca.

 

If you have any more questions about Impakt’s involvement with the design process reach out to us, we love connecting!

 

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